Author
Aurelio De Rosa

Aurelio De Rosa

Aurelio a (full-stack) web and app developer with more than 5 years experience programming for the web using HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript and PHP..

His interests also include web security, web accessibility, SEO and WordPress. He's the author of the books jQuery in Action, third edition and Instant jQuery Selectors.

Recent Articles

Testing

Improving the Quality of Front End Projects, Automatically! Pt. 3 – JavaScript and Accessibility

This series has discussed tools that help developers and companies deploy software with good quality code by automatically perform checks on different areas of front end development. Part 1 introduced the "Musketeer principle" (i.e. a developer is one element of a team and should collaborate to achieve the common goal, but the team should code […]

  • June 29, 2016
Testing

Improving the Quality of Front End Projects, Automatically! Pt. 2 – CSS and Sass

In this series, I'm focusing on tools that help developers and companies deploy software with good quality code by automatically performing checks on different areas of front end development. Part 1 introduced the "Musketeer principle" (i.e. a developer is one element of a team and should collaborate to achieve the common goal, but the team […]

  • June 22, 2016
Testing

Improving the Quality of Front End Projects, Automatically! Pt. 1 – HTML

As developers we have to focus on two main goals, one of which is very important but not strictly required. The first, required goal, and probably the most obvious one, is to create value for the company we work for. A company's ultimate goal is to make money but, believe it or not, many developers […]

  • June 15, 2016
Web

Easier Web Application Debugging with the Command Line API

Many years ago, debugging a JavaScript code base was all about console.log() calls sprinkled in one or more functions under investigation. Sometimes you’d realize that the problem was not in those functions but in one called by them, thus even more console.log() calls would be added to the code. This usually came along with a […]

  • May 17, 2016
Web

What’s New in jQuery 3

It’s been ten years since jQuery started rocking the web and it has stuck around for very good reasons. jQuery offers its users an easy-to-use interface to interact with the DOM, perform Ajax requests, create animations, and much more. In addition, unlike the DOM API, jQuery implements the composite pattern. Because of that, you can […]

  • March 2, 2016
Web

Introduction to the React JavaScript Library

2015 is lining up to be the year of React. Lately, it has garnered a lot of attention, for front-end, mobile and server side JavaScript development. React seemed to pick up steam last year but its popularity is growing day after day, in part thanks to the success of the React.js Conf that took place […]

  • February 25, 2015
Mobile

Improving Your Site with a Font Loader

Developing websites or web applications is really complex work, today more than ever. Designers and developers have to take into account a lot of factors and deal with a myriad of devices, operating systems, screen sizes, and capabilities. Then, for those who take their work seriously, there are a plethora of best practices to adhere […]

  • February 12, 2015
Opinion

W3C vs. WHATWG HTML5 Specs – The Differences Documented

A few weeks ago, HTML5 became an official W3C Recommendation. I took advantage of this event to discuss 5 interesting but now obsolete features on SitePoint. The problem is that the W3C specifications are only one side of the same coin. Starting from this version of HTML, developers and browser vendors can choose between two […]

  • December 29, 2014
Web

Polyfilling Doesn’t Have to be Difficult

In 2010 Remy Sharp published an article on his blog where he introduced a new word: polyfill. A polyfill, as he wrote, is a piece of code (or plugin) that provides the technology that you, the developer, expect the browser to provide natively. In the same post he explained why he coined this word: Earlier […]

  • December 10, 2014
Web

Improving Site Performance with the Navigation Timing API

The web is evolving at a crazy pace. Every day new frameworks, tools, and libraries are released with the ambition, if not the potential, to become the next jQuery. As a developer, I feel that sometimes it’s really hard to stay up-to-date with all the new software, techniques and practices introduced by top-notch developers and […]

  • October 14, 2014